Yan Kamov
Graphic Design Studio
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F.A.Q.

F.A.Q.

What types of clients do you typically work with?
We aren’t exclusive to any specific niches or verticals and work with clients of all sizes. Ideally, we like to partner with people who are:

  • Looking to create or evolve their brand identity

  • Design-centric or have an appreciation for a good design process

  • Open to content strategy as well as design

  • Passionate, inspired and want to shake things up a bit

  • Appreciative of coffee and/or beer and don’t mind having one with us occasionally

We’re an ad/marketing/interactive agency looking for a design partner, interested?
Totally! We love making new friends in the industry and are always looking for good strategic partners. We like to think we are flexible when collaborating, as long as our partners share a similar approach to getting things done.

How much is a identity/brochure/integrated project going to cost?
Everyone’s favorite question. We approach each project as a unique challenge with it’s own set of problems, so we price each project differently. We want to make good design accessible, so we try to price appropriately for smaller businesses and charge a flat project fee whenever possible. Generally we like to take on integrated projects that feature multiple phases of brand development. Send us an email with your specific project, we will give you an estimate, but if you’re looking for a $100 logo, we’re probably not the best fit for you.
 
How long does a identity/brochure/integrated project take? 

Again, answering this really depends on project specifics as well as our current workload. We work fast, but we are not wizards. Only superheroes.
 
Will you give us some test designs before we decide to hire you?

Sure, if you pay us for our time. Otherwise, we consider this spec work, and will not provide any creative work before a contract is signed and payment terms are in place. We believe our portfolio stands for itself and is a more than adequate example of our capabilities. Furthermore, we believe spec work creates potential for awkward client relationships, IP theft and spec work generally damages our industry. 
 
Do you do pro bono work for not-for-profits?

We have and will continue to provide pro bono work to organizations and causes we feel worthy. When deciding to provide our services pro bono, we look for smaller, socially and environmentally responsible non-profits who support causes we believe in. If you are interested in pro bono creative work, please reach out to us and let us know what you’re all about.

I’m a design student, do you guys do portfolio reviews?
Yes, we love to support students and the design community in general whenever we can. If you’re interested in submitting your portfolio, get in touch, buy us a beer and leave your ego at the door.

Why the name Yan Kamov?
Basically our name is combined from the names of our two heroes. One is Jan (Yan) Palach, a Czech protester. Symbolically it’s the name of a legendary rock club in our hometown of Rijeka. The “surname” comes from the nickname of a local writer/rebel/ literal genius Janko Polic-Kamov . The name connects to our creative lifestyle and liberal mindset both professionally and privately. Also, we think Yan Kamov sounds and looks pretty cool. Found out more about Jan Palach here, and Janko Polic Kamov- here.

Do you do web development in-house?
Almost, but we have long term partners that we work with as well as contract out to a small network of trusted developers. This typically depends on the scope of the project and if a CMS platform is needed.
 
How do you like to communicate during a project?

Technology now provides us all kinds of cool ways to interact, and we have adopted a few methods we really like. We’re quite comfortable with phone calls, email,  and Skype. We can also adapt to a project management app if needed (like Asana). Ideally we like to meet all of our clients in person at least once, when geography allows.
 
What does a ‘content-first’ approach mean?

As we've worked with clients over the years, we've realized that content—or lack of good content—plays a big role on the effectiveness of visual design. Because of this, we have found ourselves helping our clients more and more with their content to make the overall design more successful. Basically, even well executed design doesn't do much when the content is poor.